South Florida Birding Locations

Location descriptions are arranged geographically. You can either use the links here at the top, including an alphabetical index, or you can scroll down to browse the site descriptions. Directions and map links are provided for each location.

Geographical Regions

Birding locations in south Florida are divided geographically into several categories.

  • The Florida Keys & Dry Tortugas
  • Broward County
  • Palm Beach County
  • Other south Florida locations
    Includes Tigertail Beach, Corkscrew Swamp, Jonathan Dickinson State Park and others.
  • Alphabetical List of Locations

    North Miami-Dade County

    Greynold's Park

    Highlights: Migrant and wintering songbirds, possible anywhere in the park. Greynold's Park once boasted a large wading bird rookery. The rookery was abandoned during the 1990's, likely due to raccoon predation after alligators were removed from the park.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at Miami Gardens Drive (exit 14). Drive east 2.2 miles to the park entrance (fee on weekends, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Biscayne Gardens/Golden Glades

    Highlights: Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned, Blue-crowned, Mitred, and White-eyed Parakeets; Chestnut-fronted Macaw; White-fronted, Orange-winged and Red-crowned Parrots, Spot-breasted Oriole.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at NW 151 Avenue (exit 11). Biscayne Gardens/Golden Glades is a residential neighborhood in North Miami. Drive the neighborhoods east of I-95, between NW 151 Street and NW 135 Street, especially along South Biscayne River Drive. Map

    Elaine Gordon Enchanted Forest & Arch Creek Parks

    Highlights: These adjacent parks are good for migrant and wintering songbirds, which are possible anywhere in the parks.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at NW 135 Street (Exit 10B). Drive east 2.8 miles to the entrance to Elaine Gordon Enchanted Forest Park (no fee, open sunrise to sunset). The entrance to Arch Creek Park is 0.1 miles farther east (no fee, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Miami Shores

    Highlights: Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned, Black-hooded, Blue-crowned, Mitred, Red-masked, Crimson-fronted and White-eyed Parakeets; Chestnut-fronted Macaw; White-fronted, Orange-winged and Red-crowned Parrots, Spot-breasted Oriole.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at NW 103 Street (exit 8B). Miami Shores is a residential neighborhood. Bird the neighborhoods east of I-95, between NE 119 Street and NE 95 Street, east to Miami Shores Country Club. Map

    Miami Beach

    Highlights: Monk, Blue-crowned, Mitred, and White-eyed Parakeets, Chestnut-fronted Macaw, Scaly-headed Parrot, migrant and wintering songbirds.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at I-195 (exit 4B). Drive east 4.5 miles over the Julia Tuttle Causeway to Arthur Godfrey Road (W 41 Street) on Miami Beach. Bird the neighborhoods around Muss Park (on Chase Avenue, no fee) and Pine Tree Park (on Pine Tree Drive, no fee). Both parks are just north of Arthur Godfrey Road. Map

    Miami Springs

    Highlights: Monk, Yellow-chevroned, Blue-crowned, Green, Mitred, Scarlet-fronted, Red-masked, Crimson-fronted, White-eyed and Dusky-headed Parakeets; Blue-fronted, Orange-winged, Red-crowned and Yellow-crowned Parrots, Gray Kingbird, Spot-breasted Oriole.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at the Airport Expressway (SR 112, Exit 4B). Drive west 3.5 miles, exiting on NW 36 Street. Drive 1.5 miles to Curtiss Parkway (NW 57 Avenue), and turn right. From the Palmetto Expressway (SR 826), exit at NW 36 Street. Drive east 2 miles to Curtiss Parkway, and turn left. Miami Springs is a residential community north of Miami International Airport. Bird the neighborhood around Fair Haven Nursing Home on Curtiss Parkway (1 mile north of NE 36 Street), as well as the neighborhood around the intersection of Wren Avenue and Apache Street (drive north to a traffic circle and turn right on Westward Drive 1.4 miles to Apache Street and turn right. Drive 0.2 miles to Wren Avenue.) Map

    South Miami-Dade County

    Crandon Park, Key Biscayne

    Highlights: Magnificent Frigatebird, Reddish Egret, shorebirds, gulls (including Lesser Black-backed Gull) and terns can be seen at Crandon Beach. Migrant and wintering songbirds, plus exotic waterfowl at Crandon Gardens, at the south end of the park. Mangrove Cuckoo is possible during summer on the boardwalk at Bear Cut Preserve, accessed from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Nature Center, at the north end of the park.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at the Rickenbacker Causeway (exit 1). Drive east to the causeway toll plaza. Continue 4.5 miles to the park entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Map

    Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park, Key Biscayne

    Highlights: Magnificent Frigatebird, Gray Kingbird (spring and summer), migrant and wintering songbirds, and rarely, Caribbean vagrants. Good birding areas include the bike path, interior nature trail and the youth campground. All can be accessed from the No Name Harbor parking area (first right after the entrance station). Baggs birdlist

    Directions: From I-95, exit at the Rickenbacker Causeway (exit 1). Drive east to the causeway toll plaza. Continue 6 miles to the park entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Map

    A. D. Barnes Park

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Monk and Yellow-chevroned Parakeets, Gray Kingbird (summer), Hill Myna, Spot-breasted Oriole, migrant and wintering songbirds, and rarely, Caribbean vagrants. Birds may be found throughout the park, but especially the grounds of the Sense of Wonder Nature Center. To reach the nature center, turn left after entering the park. The entrance is at the end of this road. If the entrance gate is locked, backtrack to the baseball field parking area. You can enter through a pedestrian gate opposite the field. Barnes birdlist

    Directions: From the Palmetto Expressway, exit at Bird Road (SW 40 Street). Drive east 0.5 miles to SW 72 Avenue and turn left to the park entrance (no fee, open 7:00 AM until sunset). Map

    Pinewood Cemetery

    Highlights: Migrant and wintering songbirds.

    Directions: From US-1, drive east 1.8 miles on Sunset Drive (SW 72nd St.) to Erwin Road (SW 47th Avenue). Turn right and park along the low coral wall on the left side of the road. Map

    Matheson Hammock Park

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Yellow-chevroned and Red-masked Parakeets, Blue-and-yellow Macaw, Lilac-crowned Parrot, Gray Kingbird (summer), Hill Myna, migrant and wintering songbirds and rarely, Caribbean vagrants. Check the picnic area, as well as the service road and nature trail on the west side of Old Cutler Road.

    Directions: From US 1, drive east 2.4 miles on North Kendall Drive (SW 88 Street) to Old Cutler Road. Turn right and drive south 0.6 miles to the park entrance (fee for beach area, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Baptist Hospital area

    Highlights: Check the hospital grounds, as well as the neighborhood north of the hospital (across North Kendall Drive, between SW 87th and SW 91st Avenues) for White-crowned Pigeon, Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned and Mitred Parakeets, Red-whiskered Bulbul, Hill Myna and Spot-breasted Oriole. During winter, watch overhead for Short-tailed Hawk.

    Directions: Baptist Hospital is located on North Kendall Drive (SW 88th Street), 1.5 miles west of US 1, or 1 mile east of the Don Shula Expressway (SR 874). Map

    Kendall Indian Hammocks Park

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Monk and Yellow-chevroned Parakeets, Gray Kingbird (summer), Hill Myna, Spot-breasted Oriole, migrant and wintering songbirds. Birds may found throughout the park, but especially on trails through the hardwood hammock. The trailhead is opposite the baseball field parking area.

    Directions: The entrance (no fee, open 7:00 AM until sunset) is located on SW 107 Avenue, 0.4 miles north of North Kendall Drive (SW 88 Street). Map

    Kendale Lakes Park

    Highlights: Migrant and wintering songbirds. Egyptian Goose, Ring-necked Duck (winter) and other waterbirds are found on or around lakes in the surrounding neighborhoods.

    Directions: This tiny park (no fee, open sunrise until sunset), adjacent to Kendale Lakes Elementary School, is located on SW 142 Avenue, about 0.5 miles north of North Kendall Drive (SW 88 Street). A parking area is located on the north side of the school. Another parking area is accessed from SW 145 Avenue. Map

    Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport

    Highlights: Burrowing Owl (look for burrows along airport roads, marked by orange cones). In winter, look for Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on the perimeter fence at the back of the airport, accessed from SW 136 Street.

    Directions: The airport entrance is on SW 137 Avenue at SW 128 Street, 2.5 miles south of North Kendall Drive (SW 88 Street). Map

    Rocky Glades Public Small Game Hunting Area (C-357 sparrow fields)

    Highlights: A variety of sparrows can be found in brushy areas during winter. White-tailed Kite can be found year-round.

    Directions: From Krome Avenue (SW 177 Avenue), drive west 3.0 miles on SW 168 Street (Richmond Drive) to the entrance, at a yellow gate just west of the C-357 Canal. Map

    Chekika Unit (Everglades National Park)

    Highlights: Snail Kite and White-tailed Kite (sometimes seen along SW 237 Avenue), plus migrant and wintering songbirds in hammock areas.

    Directions: From the intersection of Kendall Drive (SW 88 Street) and Krome Avenue (SW 177 Avenue) drive south 5 miles to SW 168 Street. Turn right and drive west 6 miles to SW 237 Avenue. Turn right and drive north 0.6 miles to the entrance. Due to budget constraints, this location is closed until further notice.. Map

    Castellow Hammock Preserve and Nature Center

    Highlights: Wintering hummingbirds in the butterfly garden, Painted Bunting at feeders in front of the nature center, migrant and wintering songbirds in the hammock.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at SW 216 Street (exit 11). Drive west 5.4 miles to SW 162 Avenue. Turn left and drive south 0.4 miles to the park entrance (no fee, open 8:00AM to 5:00PM). Map

    Deering Estate at Cutler

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon have been found on the estate grounds throughout the year. Look for migrant and wintering songbirds, plus Mangrove Cuckoo, Gray Kingbird and Black-whiskered Vireo during spring or summer. Scaly-breasted Munias regularly visit seed feeders at the visitor center. Red-whiskered Bulbuls have been seen in the surrounding neighborhood.

    Directions: The park entrance and visitor center (fee, open 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM) is on SW 168 Street, just east of Old Cutler Road. Birding is allowed only during walks led by park staff. Map

    Bill Sadowski Park

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Painted Bunting, Spot-breasted Oriole, migrant and wintering songbirds.

    Directions: This small park (no fee, open sunrise to sunset) is located at SW 176 Street and 79th Avenue, 0.5 mile west of Old Cutler Road. Map

    Cutler Ridge Cave Swallow Roost

    Highlights: Cave Swallows of the West Indian race. In the late 1980's and early 1990's, a Bahama Swallow joined the roost.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at SW 216 Street (exit 11). Swallows roost under a turnpike bridge over a canal just north of SW 216 Street. This area is best accessed by the service road on the east side of the turnpike. Park your vehicle completely off the road. Exercise caution when birding in this high traffic area. Map

    Cutler Wetlands

    Highlights: Wintering ducks, as well as migrant and wintering shorebirds and gulls congregate here, depending upon water levels. Cutler Wetlands birdlist

    Directions: This small mitigation marsh is located at the intersection of SW 97 Avenue and SW 224 Street. From Old Cutler Road, drive east 0.5 miles on SW 224 Street. From SW 248 Street, drive north 1.5 miles on SW 97 Avenue. Find a place to park along SW 224 Street. Map

    Dump Marsh

    Highlights: Ducks, gulls and American White Pelican during winter. Wading birds are present year-round, depending upon water levels.

    Directions: Dump Marsh is a wetland across from the South Dade landfill, known to locals as “Mt. Trashmore”. From Florida's Turnpike, exit at SW 112 Avenue (exit 9). Turn right on SW 248 Street and drive east (bearing left when the road forks) to SW 97 Avenue. Continue east on the unpaved road on the south side of the canal. Park along the fence before a bridge and locked gate. Turn right beyond the gate and walk south to reach the west pond. Walk east beyond the gate to reach the east pond. Map

    Biscayne National Park / Black Point Park

    Highlights: Mangrove Cuckoo and Cuban race of Yellow Warbler (Cuban Golden Warbler) are possible during summer in mangroves around the periphery of the park. Ducks congregate offshore during winter. Shorebirds, gulls and terns can be found year-round at the end of the jetty.

    Directions: Black Point Park provides access to a jetty within Biscayne National Park. From Old Cutler Road, drive south 2.6 miles on SW 87 Avenue to the parking area (no fee, open sunrise to sunset). From Florida's Turnpike, exit at SW 112 Avenue (exit 9). Turn right on SW 248 Street and drive east (bearing left when the road forks) for 2.2 miles. Turn left and drive another 0.5 mile to a stop sign. Turn right into the parking area. Map

    Biscayne National Park / Convoy Point

    Highlights: On the jetty beyond the Dante Fascell Visitor Center, shorebirds, gulls and terns are likely year-round. Migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants are possible on Elliot Key, accessible only by boat.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at Speedway Boulevard (SW 137 Avenue, exit 6). Turn left and drive south 3 miles to North Canal Drive (SW 328 Street). Turn left and drive east 4 miles to the park entrance (no fee, open 7:00 AM to 5:30 PM). Map

    Mary Krome Park

    Highlights: This small, unmarked property, owned by Audubon of Florida, attracts wintering hummingbirds and migrant songbirds. Two Bahama Woodstar were seen here during the summer of 1981.

    Directions: The property is at the intersection of Krome Avenue (SW 177 Avenue) and Avocado Drive (SW 296 Street) in Homestead. the entrance is just north of the intersection. Do not enter adjacent avocado groves, which are private property. Map

    Homestead General Airport

    Highlights: Burrowing Owls can sometimes be found along the runway.

    Directions: The airport entrance is on SW 217 Avenue, 0.5 miles north of SW 296 Street (Avocado Drive). Map

    Lucky Hammock and the Annex (Frog Pond/Southern Glades WEA)

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon can be seen here year-round. Migrant and wintering songbirds, including Yellow-breasted Chat, Painted Bunting and various sparrows can be found in brushy areas. Sandhill Cranes can often be found in surrounding agricultural fields. During August, check fallow agricultural fields on SR 9336 for Upland Sandpiper and other shorebirds. Aerojet Road birdlist

    Directions: From the intersection of Florida's Turnpike and US 1 in Florida City, turn right on Palm Drive (SW 344 Street) and drive west 1.6 miles. Turn left on SW 192 Avenue and drive south 2.0 miles. Turn right on SW 376 Street (SR 9336) and drive west 4.5 miles to Aerojet Road (SW 232 Avenue). Lucky Hammock, in Frog Pond Wildlife Management Area, is a small hardwood hammock surrounded by agricultural fields, located 0.3 miles south of SR 9336 on the west side of Aerojet Road. The Annex, a brushy area planted in native trees, is farther south on Aerojet Road, in Southern Glades Wildlife and Environmental Area. Map

    Everglades National Park (Homestead entrance)

    Highlights: Least Bittern, Reddish Egret, Roseate Spoonbill, Wood Stork, Swallow-tailed Kite, Snail Kite, Bald Eagle, King Rail, Purple Gallinule, Limpkin, White-crowned Pigeon and Brown-headed Nuthatch may be found year-round. During spring and summer, look for Mangrove Cuckoo, Chuck-will's Widow, Gray Kingbird, Black-whiskered Vireo and the Cape Sable race of Seaside Sparrow. During winter, watch for Short-tailed Hawk, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Painted Bunting and sharp-tailed sparrows.

    Directions: From the intersection of Florida's Turnpike and US 1 in Florida City, turn right on Palm Drive (SW 344 Street) and drive west 1.6 miles. Turn left on SW 197 Avenue and drive south 2 miles. Turn right on SW 392 Street (SR 9336) and drive west 5 miles to the park entrance (fee, open 24 hours). The Ernest Coe Visitor Center is just after the park entrance, but before the fee station. Map

    Recommended stops along the main park road, from the Ernest Coe Visitor Center to Flamingo:

    Royal Palm Hammock

    Highlights: Wood Stork and other wading birds, Least Bittern, King Rail and Purple Gallinule may be seen or heard in sawgrass prairie along Anhinga Trail. Migrant and wintering songbirds may be found in a tropical hardwood hammock accessed via Gumbo Limbo Trail. Overhead, look for Swallow-tailed Kite during spring and summer, and Short-tailed Hawk during winter. These two raptors may be seen just about anywhere in the park during the appropriate season.

    Directions: Turnoff is 2 miles from Ernest Coe Visitor Center. Turn left and drive 1.8 mile to the parking area. Map

    Research Road

    Highlights: This 6-mile road leads to the Bill Robertson Research Center. Look for reintroduced Brown-headed Nuthatch and Eastern Bluebird, as well as other pineland species in pine rocklands along the first part of this road. Scan for White-tailed Kite in restored sawgrass prairie at the end of the road.

    The end of the road also contains one of the best preserved relics of the Cold War in Florida—a Nike Hercules Missile Site listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In an effort to better protect the missile site, a gate closes off the access road beyond the research centers. Except for formal tours of the Missile Site, access beyond this gate is now limited to travel by foot or bicycle. However, birders who wish to drive their cars beyond the gate may do so by using a dial combination lock on the gate.

    By providing birders with this code on an honor system, the Park hopes to meet the needs of the birding community while also ensuring the continued preservation and protection of the Park's historic Nike Missile Site. The gate combination is 1785, the year of John James Audubon's birth. To ensure that the birding community maintains access to this area, please follow posted gate instructions by re-locking the gate after entering and when leaving.

    Directions: Turnoff is on Royal Palm Hammock Road, 1 mile from the main park road. Map

    Gate 15 (Old Ingraham Highway)

    Highlights: Least Bittern, Wood Stork, Snail Kite, Bald Eagle, King Rail, wintering ducks.

    Directions: From the stop sign on Research Road, continue straight on the unpaved road (Hidden Lake Road) to a gate at the end of the road. Continue by foot about 0.5 miles to a large mound, which provides an overlook to surrounding marshes. Map

    Long Pine Key

    Highlights: Look for pineland species in the picnic area and adjacent campground. Antillean Nighthawks are occasionally heard in this area during summer. The Long Pine Key Trail passes through a tropical hardwood hammock, good for migrant and wintering songbirds.

    Directions: Turnoff is 2.2 miles past Royal Palm Hammock Road. Turn left and drive 1.5 mile to the picnic area. Map

    Pa-hay-okee

    Highlights: From the observation tower, scan for Snail Kite, Limpkin and wading birds.

    Directions: Turnoff is 8 miles past Long Pine Key Road. Turn right and drive 1.2 miles to the parking area. Map

    Mahogany Hammock

    Directions: Turnoff is 7 miles past Pa-hay-okee Road. Turn right and drive 1.7 miles to the parking area.

    Highlights: Look for migrant and wintering songbirds along the boardwalk. The Cape Sable race of Seaside Sparrow may be found, especially during spring, along the main park road about 0.5 miles past the Mahogany Hammock turnoff. Map

    Paurotis Pond

    Highlights: Large numbers of wading birds, including Roseate Spoonbill, roost on the opposite side of the pond. Wood Storks nest here.

    Directions: 4.4 miles past Mahogany Hammock Road. Map

    Nine Mile Pond

    Highlights: Watch overhead for Bald Eagle and White-crowned Pigeon in this area.

    Directions: 2 miles past Paurotis Pond. Map

    West Lake

    Highlights: Look for migrant and wintering songbirds along the boardwalk through mangrove forest, wintering waterfowl on the lake. Mangrove Cuckoo is occasionally found here.

    Directions: 4.5 miles past Nine Mile Pond. Map

    Snake Bight Trail

    Highlights: This 1.6-mile trail through mangrove forest leads to Snake Bight, an indentation in the shoreline of Florida Bay. Look for White-crowned Pigeon, Mangrove Cuckoo, Painted Bunting and migrant and wintering songbirds along this trail. The boardwalk at the end of the trail provides the best chance to see Greater Flamingo from land (though sightings have been scarce since the hurricanes of 2005). Wading birds and shorebirds are sometimes abundant at this location. Time your visit for high tide, and prepare for mosquitoes.

    Directions: 1.7 miles past West Lake. Map

    Mrazek Pond

    Highlights: Ducks, pelicans and wading birds, including Wood Stork and Roseate Spoonbill, sometimes congregate and feed here when water levels drop during late winter.

    Directions: 1.5 miles past Snake Bight Trail. Map

    Bear Lake Trail

    Highlights: Look for White-crowned Pigeon, Mangrove Cuckoo, Black-whiskered Vireo (spring and summer) and migrant and wintering songbirds as you hike this two-mile trail through tropical hardwood hammock and mangrove forest.

    Directions: Turnoff is 3.4 miles past Mrazek Pond, just past Buttonwood Canal and just before entering Flamingo. Turn right and drive Buttonwood Canal Road to the trailhead parking area. Map

    Flamingo

    Highlights: Pelicans, shorebirds, gulls and terns congregate at low tide on a sandbar offshore from the Flamingo Visitor Center. Also look for Reddish Egret, Roseate Spoonbill and other wading birds offshore, and Bald Eagle overhead. Search for Shiny Cowbirds among flocks of Brown-headed Cowbirds, feeding on lawns surrounding the visitor center parking area. Gray Kingbird and Black-whiskered Vireo breed in the area.

    Directions: Begins just beyond Buttonwood Canal. Map

    Eco Pond

    Highlights: This area was heavily damaged by hurricanes in 2005. Look for wintering ducks and shorebirds on the pond, and Bald Eagle, Roseate Spoonbill and wintering Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Painted Bunting and Nelson's and Saltmarsh Sparrows in the surrounding coastal prairie.

    Directions: 0.8 mile past Flamingo Visitor Center. Map

    Tamiami Trail

    Highlights: Roseate Spoonbill, Wood Stork, Snail Kite, Swallow-tailed Kite, Bald Eagle, King Rail, Purple Gallinule, Limpkin, Prothonotary Warbler.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at Tamiami Trail (US 41, exit 25). Drive west 3 miles to Krome Avenue (SR 997). Map

    The following recommended sites are listed in geographical order, from Krome Avenue westward:

    Francis S. Taylor Wildlife Management Area

    This is the Water Conservation Area on the north side of the Tamiami Canal, which parallels Tamiami Trail. From Krome Avenue to Shark Valley, access is via two water control structures, S-334 (1.3 miles west of Krome Avenue) and S-333 (10.7 miles farther west). Look for Snail Kite, King Rail, Purple Gallinule and Limpkin year-round, Marsh Wren and Swamp Sparrow during winter. Map

    Shark Valley (Everglades National Park)

    The Shark Valley entrance to Everglades National Park (fee, open 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM) is 20.5 miles west of Krome Avenue. A loop road (15 mile round-trip) leads to an observation tower overlooking the surrounding sawgrass marsh. The observation tower can be accessed by regularly-scheduled tram tours, by bicycle (rentals available) or by foot. In the canal along the west side of the loop road, look for a variety of wading birds, King Rail and Purple Gallinule. Roseate Spoonbill and other waders may be seen anywhere along the loop road. Map

    Abandoned Airboat Concession

    This location on the north side of Tamiami Trail, 1 mile west of Shark Valley, provides ideal opportunities to scan for Snail Kites in Francis S. Taylor Wildlife Management Area. Another good vantage point is 2.5 miles farther west, just before towers on the north side of the road. Purple Gallinule, Limpkin and a variety of wading birds can also be seen at these locations. Map

    Loop Road (Big Cypress National Preserve)

    Loop Road begins at Forty-Mile Bend, 3.7 miles west of Shark Valley. When Tamiami Trail bears right into Big Cypress National Preserve, turn left onto Loop Road. From there, it is about 23.5 miles to Monroe Station, in Collier County, where the road returns to Tamiami Trail. The road is paved for the first 8 miles, until just past the Loop Road Environmental Education Center and Tree Snail Hammock Nature Trail, in Monroe County, good for migrant and wintering songbirds. About 6 miles from Forty-Mile Bend, the road passes through a pineland area. Look here for Eastern Bluebird, Brown-headed Nuthatch and other pineland species. Sweetwater Strand is about 5 miles from Monroe Station. Breeding species in this beautiful cypress swamp include Barred Owl, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Eastern Kingbird, Red-eyed Vireo, Tufted Titmouse, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Northern Parula and Prothonotary Warbler. Map

    Kirby Storter Boardwalk (Big Cypress National Preserve)

    Located 3.3 miles west of Monroe Station, on the south side of Tamiami Trail, this half-mile boardwalk passes through cypress swamp in Georges Strand. Look for Eastern Bluebird around the parking area, and Tufted Titmouse and migrant and wintering songbirds along the boardwalk. Map

    Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk (Fakahatchee Strand)

    A 2,000-foot boardwalk through cypress swamp in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park, Big Cypress Bend is located about 20 miles west of Kirby Storter Boardwalk, on the north side of Tamiami Trail. Look for nesting Bald Eagles, Barred Owl, Pileated Woodpecker, Swallow-tailed Kite during spring and summer, plus migrant and wintering songbirds. Map

    The Florida Keys

    The Overseas Highway (US 1) leads from Florida City to Key West. Locations can be found using the highway's mile marker (MM) system.

    Card Sound Bridge

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Gray Kingbird and Cuban Golden Warbler may be found in mangroves or on wires in the area around the bridge toll station, on the mainland side of the bridge. Reddish Egret, Roseate Spoonbill and other wading birds may be seen at low tide on mudflats along Card Sound Road in Crocodile National Wildlife Refuge, on the Key Largo side of the bridge.

    Directions: From the intersection of Florida's Turnpike and US 1 in Florida City, drive south 1 mile on US 1 to Card Sound Road. Turn left and drive 12.5 miles to the bridge toll station. Map

    Key Largo Hammocks State Botanical Site

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Mangrove Cuckoo, Gray Kingbird, Black-whiskered Vireo, migrant songbirds and, rarely, Caribbean vagrants, may be found on the paved path or unpaved nature trail in the botanical site, or along Loquat Road, just south of the parking area.

    Directions: From the intersection of Florida's Turnpike and US 1 in Florida City, drive south 21 miles to CR 905. Turn left and drive north 0.4 miles to the parking area (fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Map

    John Pennekamp State Park

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Mangrove Cuckoo, Gray Kingbird, Black-whiskered Vireo, migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants are all possible within the park. Brown Booby may be seen at Molasses Reef Light, a stop on the park's glass-bottom boat tour.

    Directions: The entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM to sunset) is on US 1 at MM 102.5. Map

    Florida Keys Wild Bird Center

    Highlights: Roseate Spoonbill and other wading birds in lagoons accessed via a boardwalk system, migrant songbirds along a nature trail.

    Directions: The entrance (donation requested, open 24 hours) is on US 1 at MM 93.6. Map

    Windley Key Fossil Reef Geological State Park

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Gray Kingbird, Black-whiskered Vireo, migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants are all possible within the park.

    Directions: The entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays) is on US 1 at MM 85.3. Map

    Long Key State Park

    Highlights: Magnificent Frigatebird, Reddish Egret, Black-whiskered Vireo and migrant raptors, shorebirds and songbirds, plus Caribbean vagrants are all possible within the park.

    Directions: The entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM to sunset) is on US 1 at MM 68. Map

    Curry Hammock State Park

    Highlights: During September and October a variety of raptors, including large numbers of Peregrine Falcons, pass through on fall migration. Also possible here is Magnificent Frigatebird, Reddish Egret, and migrant shorebirds.

    Directions: The entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM to sunset) is on US 1 at MM 56.5. Map

    Marathon

    Highlights: During spring and summer, Antillean Nighthawks can be seen or heard at dusk over the airport. During migration, shorebirds often congregate in puddles at the west end of the airport. Search for migrant songbirds on trails at Crane Point Museum of Natural History. Burrowing Owls can be found at Sombrero Beach Golf Course. Roseate and Least Terns sometimes nest on rooftops at Marathon Government Center.

    Directions: Marathon Airport is on US 1 at MM 53. Crane Point Museum of Natural History is at MM 50. Sombrero Beach Golf Course is on Sombrero Boulevard, across from the museum. Marathon Government Center is at MM 48.5. Map

    Bahia Honda State Park

    Highlights: Magnificent Frigatebird, Reddish Egret, White-crowned Pigeon, Black-whiskered Vireo, migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants.

    Directions: The entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM to sunset) is on US 1 at MM 37. Map

    Key Deer National Wildlife Refuge

    Highlights: Short-tailed Hawk, Antillean Nighthawk, migrant songbirds.

    Directions: On Big Pine Key, turn right onto Key Deer Boulevard (MM 30.5). Drive 2.8 miles to the Blue Hole parking area (no fee, open 24 hours). Continue another 0.3 miles to the Frederick Manillo Nature Trail. Map

    Key West Tropical Forest and Botanical Garden

    Highlights: White-crowned Pigeon, Gray Kingbird, Black-whiskered Vireo, migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants. Scissor-tailed Flycatchers are often seen in the area during winter. During spring and summer, Antillean Nighthawks may be seen at dusk over Florida Keys Community College, also on College Road, 0.7 miles from the botanical garden.

    Directions: On Stock Island, turn right onto College Road. Drive 0.1 mile to the entrance (donation requested, open 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, hours extended during migration). Map

    Indigenous Park

    Highlights: Migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants.

    Directions: After crossing the bridge from Stock Island to Key West, turn left onto South Roosevelt Boulevard. Drive 2 miles to Bertha Street. Turn right, then left onto Atlantic Avenue. Continue 0.5 miles to White Street. Turn right into the parking area. Access to the park is via Wildlife Rescue of the Florida Keys, a wildlife rehabilitation center (no fee, opens at 8:30 AM). Map

    Ft. Zachary Taylor State Park

    Highlights: Magnificent Frigatebird, Roseate Tern, White-crowned Pigeon, Gray Kingbird, "Antillean" Short-eared Owl, migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants.

    Directions: From Indigenous Park, continue west on Atlantic Boulevard to Reynolds Street. Turn right, then left on South Street, right on Whitehead Street, and left on Southard Street, following the signs to the entrance station (fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Map

    Dry Tortugas National Park

    Highlights: Brown Booby (on national park channel markers), Masked Booby (on Hospital Key), Red-footed Booby (rare), Magnificent Frigatebird, White-tailed Tropicbird (rare), Audubon's Shearwater (en-route), Roseate Tern (on national park channel markers), Sooty Tern, Bridled Tern (en-route), Brown Noddy, Black Noddy (rare), plus "Antillean" Short-eared Owl, Antillean Nighthawk, Gray Kingbird, migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants on Garden Key, home of historic Ft. Jefferson.

    Directions: The Dry Tortugas, 68 miles west of Key West, may be reached by ferry (fee) or seaplane (fee). Map

    Broward County

    Anne Kolb Nature Center

    Highlights: Shorebirds may be seen at low tide from the end of the boardwalks.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at Sheridan Street (exit 21). Drive east 2.5 miles to the entrance (no fee, open 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM (until 7:30 PM during summer). Map

    John U. Lloyd Beach State Park

    Highlights: Pelagic species are possible around the jetty area (at the north end of the park road) during extended periods of strong easterly winds. Migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants are possible in patches of coastal hammock.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at Sheridan Street (exit 21). Drive east 2.8 miles to SR A1A. Turn left and drive north 1.5 miles to the entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Map

    Evergreen Cemetery

    Highlights: Migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants (most recently, Bahama Mockingbird and Western Spindalis) are possible in trees along the eastern and northern perimeter of the cemetery.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at Davie Boulevard (exit 26). Drive east 2 miles to US 1. Turn right and drive south 0.1 miles to SE 13 Street. Turn left and drive east 0.2 miles to the entrance (no fee, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Hugh Taylor Birch State Park

    Highlights: Look for migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants along the main park road.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at Sunrise Boulevard (exit 29). Drive east 4 miles to the entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Map

    Richardson Historic Park and Nature Preserve

    Highlights: Look for migrant songbirds along the boardwalk (a Kirtland's Warbler was found here in October, 2011).

    Directions: From I-95, exit at Oakland Park Boulevard (Exit 31). Drive east 0.9 miles to North Andrews Avenue. Turn right and drive south 0.8 miles to NE 21 Court. Turn left and drive east 0.3 miles to Wilton Drive. Turn right and drive south 1 block to NE 20 Street. Turn right to the park entrance (no fee, open 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM). Map

    Tree Tops Park

    Highlights: Look for Mottled Duck, Least Bittern and Purple Gallinule from the marsh boardwalk, Painted Bunting in brushy areas, migrant and wintering songbirds in oak hammocks.

    Directions: From I-595, exit at Nob Hill Road (eastbound exit 3, westbound exit 4). Drive south 2.4 miles to the entrance (fee on weekends, open 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM, open until 7:30 PM during summer). Map

    Brian Piccolo Park

    Highlights: Burrowing Owls are common at marked burrows throughout the park. Monk Parakeets are also common.

    Directions: From I-75, exit at Sheridan Street. Drive east 4 miles to the entrance (fee on weekends, open 9:00 AM until 6:00PM). Map

    Silver Lakes North Park/Chapel Trail Nature Preserve

    Highlights: Purple Swamphen can be found at both locations. Also look for Mottled Duck, Least Bittern, Purple Gallinule and Limpkin.

    Directions: From I-75, exit at Sheridan Street. Drive west 1.5 miles to NW 172 Avenue. Turn left; the Silver Lakes North entrance is just south of Sheridan Street (no fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Continue west 2 miles on Sheridan Street to Chapel Trail (no fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Map

    Flamingo Gardens & Everglades Wildlife Sanctuary

    Highlights: The rookery attracts Black-crowned Night-Heron, Wood Stork and Roseate Spoonbill year-round. Swallow-tailed Kite nests during summer in the overflow parking lot and Limpkins have been seen at the back lake. Painted Buntings may be seen during winter throughout the property.

    Directions: From I-595, exit at Flamingo Road (Exit 1B). Drive south 2.5 miles to the entrance, at SW 36th Court, one block north of Griffin Rd in Davie (fee, open 9:30 AM to 5:00 PM). Map

    Markham Park

    Highlights: Spot-breasted Orioles have been found on the nature trail; the trailhead is just west of the t-intersection beyond the entrance station. Least Bittern, Wood Stork, Snail Kite, King Rail, Purple Gallinule, Purple Swamphen and Limpkin can be found in the Water Conservation Area immediately west of the park.

    Directions: From I-595, exit at 136 Street (exit 1A). Drive west 2.0 miles on SR 84 (which parallels I-595) to the park entrance (fee on weekends, open 9:00 AM until 6:00PM). Map

    Fern Forest Nature Center

    Highlights: Migrant and wintering songbirds, Great Horned, Barred and Eastern Screech-Owl may be seen from the trails and boardwalks.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at Atlantic Boulevard (exit 66). Drive west 0.2 miles to Lyons Road (exit on right). Drive south 0.2 miles to the entrance (no fee, open 8:00 M to 6:00 PM). Map

    Tall Cypress Natural Area

    Highlights: Great Horned and Eastern Screech-Owl, a variety of raptors, woodpeckers and migrant and wintering songbirds may be seen from the boardwalk. Nanday Parakeets breed here; Mottled Duck and Limpkin are possible at the pond at the park's north end.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at Sample Road (exit 69). Drive west 2.8 miles to Turtle Run Boulevard. Turn right and drive north 0.1 mile to the park entrance (no fee, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Snake Road

    Highlights: Look for White-tailed Kite, Crested Caracara, Sandhill Crane, Limpkin and Burrowing Owl as you drive north through the Big Cypress Seminole Reservation (observe posted speed limits) to SR 846. Check wires and fences during winter for Western Kingbird, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher and possibly Vermilion Flycatcher.

    Directions: From I-75 (Alligator Alley), exit at Snake Road (exit 49). Map

    Palm Beach County

    Spanish River Park

    Highlights: Look for migrant songbirds and Caribbean vagrants along the park's nature trail.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at Palmetto Park Road (exit 44). Drive east 3 miles to SR A1A. Turn left and drive north 2 miles to the entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset; free, but limited parking is available along Spanish River Boulevard, north of the park). Map

    Green Cay Wetlands

    Highlights: Along the 1.5-mile boardwalk, look for Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Wood Duck, Least Bittern, Purple Gallinule and Limpkin. During winter, look for wintering ducks, American Bittern, Roseate Spoonbill, Sora and Wilson's Snipe. Painted Bunting winters in hammock areas along the boardwalk. Shiny Cowbird has been attracted to feeders near the nature center.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at Atlantic Avenue (exit 81). Drive east 0.7 miles to Hagen Ranch Road. Turn left and drive north 2.2 miles to the entrance (no fee, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Wakodahatchee Wetlands

    Highlights: Along the 1/2-mile boardwalk, look for Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Least Bittern, Purple Gallinule and Limpkin. Spot-breasted Oriole is occasionally seen in the area. During winter, look for wintering ducks, American Bittern, Sora and Wilson's Snipe.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at Atlantic Avenue (exit 81). Drive east 1.7 miles to Jog Road. Turn left and drive north 1.5 miles to the entrance (no fee, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

    Highlights: Along the impoundment trails, look for Wood Stork, Roseate Spoonbill, Snail Kite, Purple Gallinule and Limpkin. Smooth-billed Ani were once common here; a pair have been present since 2015.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at Boynton Beach Boulevard exit 86). Drive west 2 miles to US 441. Turn left and drive south 2 miles to the entrance (fee, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Okeeheelee Nature Center

    Highlights: Painted Bunting is regular during winter at the nature center feeders. Look for Wood Duck and Sandhill Crane in surrounding wetlands.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike, exit at Lake Worth Road (exit 93). Drive east 0.8 miles to Pinehurst Drive. Turn left and drive north 2.2 miles to Forest Hills Boulevard. Continue north into Okeeheelee Park. Follow the signs 2 miles to the nature center. Map

    Wellington Environmental Preserve

    Highlights: The preserve's impoundments, accessed via a 2.5-mile trail and boardwalk system that includes a six-story observation tower, attract a variety of wintering waterfowl. Limpkin is common here. Also look for Mottled Duck, Wood Stork, Roseate Spoonbill, Snail Kite and Bald Eagle.

    Directions: From Florida's Turnpike in West Palm Beach, exit at Southern Boulevard/SR 80 (Exit 97). Drive west 8 miles to Flying Cow Road. Turn left and drive south 3.5 miles to the parking area (no fee, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Juno Dunes/Jupiter Ridge Natural Areas

    Highlights: Florida Scrub-Jay is resident at both locations. Scrub-jays are most often seen on wires along US 1.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at PGA Boulevard (exit 79). Drive east 2.7 miles to US 1. Turn left and drive north 2.8 miles to Juno Dunes. Continue north 2.2 miles to Jupiter Ridge (no fees, open sunrise to sunset). Map

    Stormwater Treatment Areas 3/4 / Harold Campbell Day Use Area

    Highlights: The impoundments at STA 3/4 attract a variety of migrant shorebirds and wintering waterfowl. Also look for Mottled Duck, Least Bittern, Wood Stork, Roseate Spoonbill, Snail Kite, Bald Eagle, Purple Swamphen and Limpkin.

    Directions: From I-75 in Broward County, exit at US 27. Drive north 15 miles to Holey Land Road, just north of the Palm Beach county line. Turn left and drive west 0.5 miles to an impoundment overlook. Continue west 5 miles on Holey Land Road to the day use area (no fee, open Friday-Monday from sunrise to sunset). Map

    Everglades Agricultural Area

    Highlights: During August and September, migrant shorebirds are attracted to flooded fields and sod farms in the agricultural area south of Lake Okeechobee. Look for Upland and possibly Buff-breasted Sandpiper on sod fields along US 27. Also look for Black-bellied and Fulvous Whistling-Duck, Least Bittern, Wood Stork, Roseate Spoonbill, King Rail, Purple Gallinule and Limpkin.

    Directions: From I-75 in Broward County, exit at US 27. Drive north 15 miles into Palm Beach County. Various bridges on the east side of US 27 provide access to adjacent agricultural fields. Map
    The area may also be accessed from West Palm Beach. From I-95 or Florida's Turnpike, exit at Southern Boulevard. Drive west to the merge with US 441, continue west 11.5 miles to the intersection with CR 880, on the left. An entrance to Stormwater Treatment Area 1-E is on US 441, just east of this intersection, while an entrance to Stormwater Treatment Area 1-W is on the south side of CR 880, just west of the intersection. Flooded agricultural fields and sod farms may be found anywhere along CR 880 or on side roads with public access, including Gladeview Road (6.7 miles west of the US 441/CR 880 intersection), Sam Senter Road (2.8 miles farther west) and Browns Farm Road (another 3.7 miles farther west). Observe all “no trespassing” signs. Map

    Other locations

    Jonathan Dickinson State Park (Martin County)

    Highlights: Florida Scrub-Jay may be found in sand pine scrub near the entrance. A series of trails criss-cross this habitat. Bachman's Sparrow can be found in pine flatwoods along the Kitching Creek Trail, which begins near the picnic area at the end of the park road.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at Indiantown Road (exit 87). Drive east 4 miles to US 1. Turn left and drive north 5 miles to the entrance. Map

    DuPuis Management Area (Martin County)

    Highlights: Red-cockaded Woodpeckers have been reintroduced to the management area. Nest clusters can be found along the 7.5-mile auto tour road; nest trees are marked with white bands. Also look for Wild Turkey, Northern Bobwhite, Wood Stork, Bald Eagle and Limpkin year-round and Swallow-tailed Kite during spring and summer.

    Directions: From I-95, exit at CR 708 (Exit 96). Drive west 4.8 miles to SR 76. Turn left and drive west 15 miles to the auto tour road entrance, on the left (no fee, open 24 hours). Map

    Stormwater Treatment Area 5/6 (Hendry County)

    Highlights: Access via regular tours only. See the STA 5/6 Schedule for dates and registration details. The impoundments at STA-5/6 attract a variety of migrant shorebirds and wintering waterfowl. Also look for Black-bellied and Fulvous Whistling Duck, Mottled Duck, Least Bittern, Wood Stork, Roseate Spoonbill, Snail Kite, Bald Eagle, Crested Caracara, Purple Gallinule, Purple Swamphen and Limpkin.

    Directions (Entrance via Deer Fence Road): Map

    • Via Alligator Alley: STA-5/6 is south of Clewiston on the NW corner of Rotenberger WMA. From Miami: Get to Alligator Alley via your favorite route (e.g., Turnpike to I-75, Palmetto to I-75, I-95 to I-595 W to I- 75). Go west to Snake Road at the Micosukee gas station (exit 49). Take Snake Road north to CR-835. Follow CR-835 for 3 miles to Deer Fence Road (on right at curve). Go east on Deer Fence Road (dirt road) for 2 miles, cross the bridge at STA-5/6; continue east on the unpaved road to the parking area east of the tower.
    • Via South Bay: Take US-27 north or SR-80 west (from Palm Beach) to US-27 at South Bay. Go west on US-27 toward Clewiston for 13 1/2 miles. Look for Evercane Road (CR-835) and the J & J Ag. Products sign. Continue south on CR-835 for about 26.7 miles to Deer Fence Road. Turn left onto Deer Fence Road (dirt road) and continue about 2 miles, cross the bridge at STA-5/6; continue east on the unpaved road to the parking area east of the tower.
    • Directions from Naples/Ft. Myers area:
      If you live to the south, you should take Alligator Alley east to the Micosukee gas station at exit 49, and follow the directions above.

      Otherwise, make your way to the town of Immokalee via SR-29 or CR-846. Once in the town of Immokalee, proceed east on CR-846 watching for the “jog” in the road near the Immokalee Airport. Take C-R846 east all the way to CR833. Make the very sharp right turn onto CR-833 and continue driving east to CR-835 as if going to Clewiston. Follow CR-835 for 3 miles to Deer Fence Road (on right at curve). Cross the bridge at STA-5 Deer Fence entrance gate. Continue going east to the unpaved road. Go east on Deer Fence Road (dirt road) for 2 miles, cross the bridge at STA-5/6; continue east on the unpaved road to the parking area east of the tower.

    Tigertail Beach, Marco Island (Collier County)

    Highlights: This is the closest location to Miami where Snowy Plover can be found. Also look for Magnificent Frigatebird, Reddish Egret and Bald Eagle, plus an assortment of migrant and wintering shorebirds, including American Oystercatcher, Whimbrel, Marbled Godwit and Red Knot, and occasionally Long-billed Curlew. Watch for Burrowing Owl in marked burrows along Kendall Drive and elsewhere on Marco Island. During summer, look for Gray Kingbird on wires anywhere on the island.

    Directions: From I-75 (Alligator Alley), exit at SR 951 (exit 101). Drive south 15 miles to Kendall Drive on Marco Island. Turn right and drive west 0.6 miles to Hernando Drive. Turn left and drive south 0.2 miles to the beach entrance (fee, open 8:00 AM until sunset). Map

    Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary (Collier County)

    Highlights: Along the 2-mile boardwalk, look for Purple Gallinule and Limpkin year-round, nesting Wood Stork during late winter, and Swallow-tailed Kite during spring and summer. Painted Buntings come to feeders along the boardwalk during winter. During spring and fall, a variety of migrant songbirds may be found.

    Directions: From I-75, exit at Immokalee Road (exit 111). Drive east 15.2 miles to Sanctuary Road. Turn left and drive 1.5 miles to the entrance (fee, open 7:00 AM to 5:30 PM, until 7:30 PM during spring and summer). Map

    Babcock-Webb Wildlife Management Area (Charlotte County)

    Highlights: Red-cockaded Woodpecker nest clusters can be found in areas marked with RCW signs. One such sign is on Oil Well Grade, 0.8 miles north of its intersection with Tucker Grade. Also look for Brown-headed Nuthatch, Eastern Bluebird and Bachman's Sparrow in pine flatwoods; King Rail, Sandhill Crane and Limpkin in wet areas.

    Directions: From I-75, exit at Tucker Grade (exit 158). Drive east 0.5 miles to the entrance. Map