South Florida Specialties

Florida has one endemic species, the Florida Scrub-Jay. In the past, the endemic Cape Sable (Seaside) Sparrow was considered a full species.

Many birds with a primarily neotropical distribution are found in South Florida. Information concerning many of these birds can be found on our South Florida Specialties page. Some of these primarily neotropical birds, such as Anhinga, are so common that we don't list information on the specialties page.

Where Can I Find?

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck Purple Gallinule Tropical Kingbird
Fulvous Whistling-Duck Limpkin Gray Kingbird
Egyptian Goose Snowy Plover Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Mottled Duck Lesser Black-backed Gull Bell's Vireo
Masked Booby Brown Noddy Black-whiskered Vireo
Brown Booby Sooty Tern Florida Scrub-Jay
Magnificent Frigatebird Roseate Tern Cave Swallow
Least Bittern White-crowned Pigeon Brown-headed Nuthatch
Reddish Egret Mangrove Cuckoo Red-whiskered Bulbul
Roseate Spoonbill Smooth-billed Ani Common Myna
Wood Stork Burrowing Owl Hill Myna
American Flamingo Lesser Nighthawk Cuban Golden (Yellow) Warbler
Swallow-tailed Kite Antillean Nighthawk Prothonotary Warbler
White-tailed Kite Chuck-will's-widow Yellow-breasted Chat
Snail Kite Red-cockaded Woodpecker Bachman's Sparrow
Bald Eagle Monk Parakeet Sharp-tailed Sparrows
Great Black-Hawk Nanday Parakeet Seaside Sparrow
Short-tailed Hawk White-winged Parakeet Painted Bunting
Crested Caracara Other Parrots Shiny Cowbird
Black Rail Brown-crested Flycatcher Bronzed Cowbird
King Rail Alder Flycatcher Spot-breasted Oriole
Gray-headed Swamphen Vermilion Flycatcher Scaly-breasted Munia

What about West Indian vagrants?

White-cheeked Pintail Zenaida Dove Thick-billed Vireo
Masked Duck Key West Quail-Dove Bahama Swallow
Least Grebe Ruddy Quail-Dove Bahama Mockingbird
White-tailed Tropicbird “Arawak” Short-eared Owl Bananaquit
Red-footed Booby Bahama Woodstar Western Spindalis
Neotropic Cormorant Cuban Pewee Yellow-faced Grassquit
Black Noddy La Sagra's Flycatcher Black-faced Grassquit
Loggerhead Kingbird

Need More Info?

A variety of birding and nature books are available through the TAS Store on amazon.com, including Brian Rapoza's Birding Florida, which covers many birding locations throughout the state.

The Birds

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck

Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are most likely at Stormwater Treatment Area 5 (STA-5), in Hendry County, but are also possible in the Everglades Agricultural Area and at STA-1E and Wakodahatchee and Green Cay Wetlands, in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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Fulvous Whistling-Duck

Fulvous Whistling-Ducks are most likely at Stormwater Treatment Area 5 (STA-5), in Hendry County, but are also possible in the Everglades Agricultural Area and STA-1E, in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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Egyptian Goose

This introduced species can be found along suburban canals and lakes, often with Muscovy Ducks and other introduced waterfowl. Reliable locations in Miami-Dade County include Crandon Gardens on Key Biscayne, Baptist Hospital, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Gardens and Lake Laura (SW 137 Avenue/SW 82 Street in Kendale Lakes). In Broward County, try Plantation Preserve (7050 W Broward Blvd.), Tall Cypress Natural Area or Brian Piccolo Park.
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Mottled Duck

Mottled Ducks are likely at Dump Marsh and Cutler Wetlands, and are resident at Wakodahatchee and Green Cay Wetlands in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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White-cheeked Pintail

White-cheeked Pintails are resident throughout much of the Caribbean, but are only occasionally seen in Florida. It's also difficult to determine if individuals are escapees or true vagrants. The most recent sighting in south Florida was from Grassy Waters Preserve in Palm Beach County in 2011.
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Masked Duck

Masked Ducks are resident in scattered locations throughout the Caribbean, but are only occasionally seen in Florida. The most recent sighting in south Florida was from the Gate 15 area of Everglades National Park in 2010; others have been found recently at locations in central Florida. Pic/ID
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Least Grebe

Least Grebes are resident throughout the Caribbean, but are only occasionally seen in Florida. The last verified sighting in south Florida was in Spring, 2017 at Yamato Scrub in Palm Beach County. A pair of Least Grebes raised two chicks at this location in Fall, 2008. The first sighting was at Key Deer National Wildlife Refuge in Monroe County in 1988. Pic/ID
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White-tailed Tropicbird

White-tailed Tropicbirds breed throughout the Caribbean, but are only rarely seen in Florida. Most sightings have been from the Dry Tortugas. Both White-tailed and Red-billed Tropicbirds are occasionally seen on pelagic trips off the eastern coast of south Florida. Pic/ID
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Masked Booby

Masked Boobies nest on Hospital Key in the Dry Tortugas. Pic/ID
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Brown Booby

Brown Boobies often perch on navigational light towers off the Florida Keys, including Molasses Reef Light off Key Largo, visited daily during the glass-bottom boat tour at John Pennekamp State Park. Brown Boobies can sometimes be seen on channel markers in the Dry Tortugas. Pic/ID
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Red-footed Booby

Red-footed Boobies breed on remote islands in scattered locations throughout the Caribbean and are seen occasionally in Florida. They are most often found in the Dry Tortugas bus have also been seen on light towers off the Miami-Dade coast. Pic/ID
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Neotropic Cormorant

Neotropic Cormorants are resident in the Bahamas and Cuba. The first verified sighting in Florida was from Boca Chica Beach, near Key West, in 2007. Others were found there in 2009 and 2014 through 2016. Since 2012, Neotropic Cormorants have been found during winter at Wakodahatchee Wetlands in Palm Beach County; one or two have been seen on nests. Pic/ID
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Magnificent Frigatebird

Magnificent Frigatebirds are most common during summer in the Florida peninsula and are easy to see on Key Biscayne. They roost on an island off Crandon Marina, to your right after you cross the Bear Cut Bridge onto Key Biscayne. They may be seen year-round in the Florida Keys and the Dry Tortugas. Pic/ID
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Least Bittern

Least Bitterns are more often heard than seen at locations such as Anhinga Trail in Everglades National Park. During spring and summer, they are often conspicuous at Wakodahatchee and Green Cay Wetlands in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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Reddish Egret

Reddish Egrets prefer coastal beaches and mudflats. A reliable location is at the Flamingo visitor center in Everglades National Park. Other locations include Gulf coast beaches such as Tigertail Beach on Marco Island. Pic/ID
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Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbills can usually be seen at Paurotis Pond and Flamingo, and sometimes at Shark Valley, in Everglades National Park. During late summer, they often congregate in large numbers in the Everglades Agricultural Area in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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Wood Stork

Wood Storks nest at Paurotis Pond in Everglades National Park, but can often be found during winter at Anhinga Trail, Mrazek Pond, Shark Valley and other locations within the National Park. It is also not unusual to see them feeding in wet areas along highways. During late summer, they often congregate in large numbers in the Everglades Agricultural Area in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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American Flamingo

American Flamingos have become scarce since the hurricanes of 2005, but are still reported occasionally in Florida Bay or in the Keys. They have been most recently seen in Snake Bight and at Lake Ingraham in Everglades National Park. These locations are most easily accessed by motorized boat, though Snake Bight can also be reached at high tide by canoe or kayak. They are no longer likely to be seen from the boardwalk at the end of Snake Bight Trail. Large flocks of flamingoes have been seen in the Everglades Agricultural Area during spring, especially at STA-2 in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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Swallow-tailed Kite

These beautiful raptors arrive in Florida in late February and return to their wintering grounds in South and Central America by September. Look for them anywhere along the main park road in Everglades National Park, as well as at Royal Palm Hammock, Long Pine Key, Paurotis Pond, West Lake and the Flamingo area. They may also be seen along Tamiami Trail in Big Cypress National Preserve, at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary in Naples and even in suburban Miami-Dade, especially the South Miami area. Pic/ID
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White-tailed Kite

White-tailed Kites are occasionally seen in Southwest Miami-Dade. Places to check include over fields, around Lucky Hammock on Aerojet Road, the C-357 sparrow fields on SW 168 Street and along SW 237th Avenue, in the East Everglades near the Chekika Unit of Everglades National Park. In the main portion of the national park they are most often found in the restoration area at the end of Research Road. They seem to prefer prairie-like areas, including some farm fields. Pic/ID
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Snail Kite

Throughout the year but especially during winter, Snail Kites can be found on the north side of U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail) near the Shark Valley section of Everglades National Park. Good vantage points are the parking lot of the Miccosukee Indian Restaurant (across from the Shark Valley entrance), and the abandoned airboat concession just across the road from the Everglades Tower Motel, a mile west of Shark Valley. Snail Kites can also be found in the Water Conservation Area west of Markham Park in Broward County, at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in Palm Beach County. They can be common at Stormwater Treatment Area 5 (STA-5) in Hendry County and STA-1E in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle may be seen soaring overhead anywhere in Everglades National Park, but are more likely in the Flamingo area. They are also often seen over Dump Marsh and Cutler Wetlands in Miami-Dade. Pic/ID
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Great Black-Hawk

Although not ABA-countable, Great Black-Hawks of unknown origin have been seen in the Miami area since the 1970's. In recent years, most sightings have been on Virginia Key. Robin Diaz has provided a detailed summary of the situation.
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Short-tailed Hawk

During winter, Short-Tailed Hawks can be most reliably seen in Everglades National Park. They are seen regularly over Royal Palm Hammock (watch for them among kettles of vultures), along Research Road, at West Lake, Nine Mile Pond and Eco Pond in Flamingo. They can also be seen over suburban Miami-Dade parks. Pic/ID
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Crested Caracara

The closest reliable location for Crested Caracara is along Snake Road (CR 833) in Broward County and Pole Crossing Road (CR 846) in Hendry County. The southern terminus of Snake Road is at Exit 49 of Alligator Alley (I-75). Pic/ID
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Black Rail

Black Rails are rarely seen, but during winter, they can sometimes be heard at dawn or dusk along the Coastal Prairie Trail in Flamingo, or along the main park road just south of the Mahogany Hammock turnoff in Everglades National Park. Pic/ID
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King Rail

King Rails are more often heard than seen; your best bet is to visit Shark Valley, in Everglades National Park, early in the morning. They are also regularly seen in the East Everglades, along SW 237th Avenue (follow the signs toward Chekika). Pic/ID
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Gray-headed Swamphen

This introduced species, formerly known as Purple Swamphen, is common at Stormwater Treatment Area 5 (STA-5) in Hendry County and STA1-E, STA1-W and Harold Campbell Day Use Area (STA3/4) in Palm Beach County. Swamphens can still be found at several locations in Broward County, including the City Furniture wetlands on Hiatus Road between McNab Road and Commercial Boulevard, the wetlands near Southeast Regional Library, on the north side of Sheridan Street, 1.2 miles west of I-75 in Pembroke Pines, Silver Lakes North Park, on the south side of Sheridan Street, 0.3 mile west of the library, Chapel Trail Nature Preserve, 2 miles west of Silver Lakes North Park and at Water Conservation Area 2-A, accessed from Markham Park. In Miami-Dade, swamphens can be found in wetlands surrounding Dolphin Mall at Florida's Turnpike and the Dolphin Expressway (SR 836).
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Purple Gallinule

Look for Purple Gallinule at Anhinga Trail and at Shark Valley (especially in the canal along the west side of the loop road) in Everglades National Park, and at Wakodahatchee Wetlands, Green Cay Wetlands and Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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Limpkin

Limpkins can reliably be found at Shark Valley, along Snake Road (CR 833) in Broward County and at Wakodahatchee Wetlands, Green Cay Wetlands, Wellington Environmental Preserve, and Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in Palm Beach County. They are often abundant at STAs in Palm Beach and Hendry Counties. Pic/ID
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Snowy Plover

Snowy Plover nests in small numbers on Gulf Coast beaches. Reliable locations in south Florida include Tigertail Beach on Marco Island (Collier County) and Big Carlos Pass near Ft. Myers Beach (Lee County). Pic/ID
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Lesser Black-backed Gull

Lesser Black-backed Gulls are easist to find at Crandon Beach on Key Biscayne. Pic/ID
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Brown Noddy

Brown Noddies are easy to see during spring and summer in the Dry Tortugas, their only nesting location in North America. Pic/ID
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Black Noddy

Black Noddies are rare but almost annual spring visitors to the Dry Tortugas. The most recent confirmed sighting was from April, 2017. Pic/ID
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Sooty Tern

Sooty Terns are easy to see during spring and summer in the Dry Tortugas, their only nesting location in North America. Pic/ID
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Roseate Tern

Roseate Terns breed during summer in the Florida Keys. One location where they have nested in recent years is on the roof of the Government Center buildings, at mile marker 48.5 in Marathon. They may also be seen perched on channel markers in the Dry Tortugas. Pic/ID
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White-crowned Pigeon

White-crowned Pigeons are most common in the Florida Keys. Look for them at Key Largo Hammocks State Botanical Site, and in Key West. They may also be perched on wires anywhere along US 1 from Key Largo to Key West. They can often be seen in Everglades National Park, as well as in the Lucky Hammock area, just outside the park. Good areas within the park include Royal Palm Hammock, Paurotis and Nine Mile Ponds (scan the treetops on the far side of the ponds), and along Snake Bight Trail. Finally, they may be found in suburban south Miami-Dade. Check wires in South Miami and around Baptist Hospital, as well as at A.D. Barnes, Matheson Hammock and Kendall Indian Hammocks Parks. Pic/ID
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Zenaida Dove

Zenaida Doves are resident throughout the Caribbean, but are only occasionally seen in Florida. The most recent sighting is from Long Key State Park in 2016. The last previous sighting was from Key Largo in 2009.
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Key West Quail-Dove

Key West Quail-Doves are resident in the Bahamas, Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico, but are only occasionally seen in Florida. Recent sightings include at least two at Long Key State Park in the Middle Keys and another at the Deering Estate at Cutler in the fall/winter of 2014. Older sightings include from Hugh Taylor Birch State Park and Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park, both in 1999, and from Elliot Key, Biscayne National Park, in 2002.
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Ruddy Quail-Dove

Ruddy Quail-Doves are resident throughout the Caribbean (except the Bahamas), but are only occasionally seen in Florida. The most recent sighting was from Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park on Key Biscayne in fall, 2013. An older sighting was from Hugh Taylor Birch State Park in 2002.
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Mangrove Cuckoo

Black Point Park in Miami-Dade has been a reliable location for this secretive species, especially during spring. Other locations worth trying include Key Largo Hammocks State Botanical Site and Snake Bight and Bear Lake Trails in Everglades National Park. Pic/ID
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Smooth-billed Ani

This species has virtually disappeared as a breeding bird in Florida. During the winter of 2016-17, anis were reported from a number of locations in south and central Florida. These individuals were most likely vagrants from the Bahamas, dispersing following the passage of Hurrican Matthew in fall, 2016. Other recent sightings include a pair that has engaged in nest-building at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in 2015-16. Anis may also continue in the Everglades Agricultural Area of Palm Beach County. Pic/ID
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Burrowing Owl

Burrowing Owls reside at a number of local airports, including Kendall/Tamiami Executive Airport (SW 137 Avenue, between SW 120 and SW 136 Street), Homestead General Aviation Airport (SW 217 Avenue, north of SW 296 Street), Opa-Locka Airport (NW 135 Street, between NW37 and NW 57 Avenue) and Ft. Lauderdale Executive Airport (NW 21 Avenue, north of Commercial Boulevard). Burrowing Owls can also be found at Brian Piccolo Park, on Sheridan Street in Cooper City (Broward County), at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton (Palm Beach County), on golf courses and in residential areas in Marathon (Monroe County), on Marco Island (Collier County) and in Cape Coral (Lee County). Burrows at all of these locations are usually marked with stakes, orange cones or t-bars. Pic/ID
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“Arawak” (Short-eared) Owl

The Arawak Owl is the Antillean race of Short-eared Owl. It is resident in Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico and is an almost annual visitor to the Dry Tortugas. Individuals are sometimes found at Ft. Zachary Taylor State Park in Key West. The Antillean race is buffier than the continental race, itself an occasional winter visitor to the Florida mainland.
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Lesser Nighthawk

Lesser Nighthawk winters in small numbers in south Florida. Reliable locations include Dump Marsh, the Lucky Hammock area on Aerojet Road and around Eco Pond in Flamingo, Everglades National Park. ID
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Antillean Nighthawk

Antillean Nighthawks can be found during spring and summer over Marathon and Key West airports in the Florida Keys and occasionally in Key Largo. Common Nighthawks are also likely at these locations, so learn to distinguish them by call ("pity-pit-pit" for Antillean, "peent" for Common). ID
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Chuck-will's-widow

Chuck-will's-widows are most likely to be seen during spring and fall migration, when they perch on tree limbs in hardwood hammocks and often flush when approached. Good locations during migration include A.D. Barnes Park and Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park. During spring and summer, Chuck-will's-widows may be heard just before sunrise around pinelands and hammocks in Everglades National Park. Reliable locations include the pinelands around the entrance station and the Royal Palm Hammock parking area. Pic/ID
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Bahama Woodstar

Bahama Woodstars are endemic to the Bahamas, but are very rarely seen in Florida. The most recent record was from Brevard County in May, 2017. The last verified sighting in south Florida was from Homestead in 1981.
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Red-cockaded Woodpecker

Red-cockaded Woodpeckers nest in Big Cypress National Preserve as well as in J W Corbett Wildlife Management Area in Palm Beach and Martin Counties, but in locations inaccessible to birders or heavily used by hunters. This species has been recently introduced to DuPuis Management Area in Martin and Palm Beach Counties; accessible nest clusters can be found along the management area's auto tour road. They also nest at Babcock Webb Wildlife Management Area, in Charlotte County. Pic/ID
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Parrots

Over 75 species of parrots have been introduced to Florida; of these, at least 20 species are now breeding in the state. Only four are currently ABA-countable in Florida; of these, three are countable in the Miami area:

Monk Parakeet

Monk Parakeet: While parrots introduced to Florida typically nest in tree cavities, Monk Parakeets are the only species that builds communal stick nests. These large, bulky nests can be found throughout suburban southeast Florida, sometimes in trees but also on power poles and other man-made structures. Reliable locations in Miami-Dade include Miami Shores, Miami Springs (around the Fair Haven Nursing Home), Key Biscayne, Baptist Hospital and Kendall Indian Hammocks, A D Barnes and Matheson Hammock Parks. The parakeets are often found around shopping centers along SW 88 Street (Kendall Drive); stick nests are conspicuous on power poles where North Kendall Drive crosses SW 127 Avenue. In Broward County, try Everglades Holiday Park on US 27 at the western end of Griffin Road and Topeekeegee Park in Hollywood.
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White-winged Parakeet

Canary-winged Parakeet has been split into Yellow-chevroned Parakeet (Brotogeris chiriri) and White-winged Parakeet (Brotogeris versicolurus). Currently, only the White-winged Parakeet is ABA-countable. White-winged and Yellow-chevroned Parakeets are widespread in the Miami area and may be seen almost anywhere. White-winged Parakeets are more common in Broward and the Miami Shores area of north Miami-Dade, while Yellow-chevroned is dominant in Miami Springs, Coral Gables, Kendall and South Miami. In recent years, White-winged Parakeets have been frequently seen near the intersection of NW 42 Avenue (LeJeune Road) and NW 7 Street, south of Miami International Airport. Both species have been seen at Baptist Hospital; look in trees around the ponds at the front of the hospital. Other locations include A D Barnes and Matheson Hammock Parks. Pic/ID
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Nanday Parakeet

In southeast Florida, Nanday Parakeets are most often seen in Broward and Palm Beach Counties. Reliable locations in Broward include Tall Cypress Natural Area, along US 1 near Ft Lauderdale International Airport and around the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame on Griffin Road, just west of I-95. Boynton Inlet in Boynton Beach is a reliable location in Palm Beach. Nandays can sometimes be found in Miami-Dade (Biscayne Gardens, Miami Shores and the ZooMiami area are reliable locations). Nandays are common in the Tampa/St. Petersburg area.

Other Parrots

Budgerigar: This species, which once numbered in the thousands on the west coast, has been extirpated from Florida. Individuals encountered will all be recent escapees.

The following areas in Miami-Dade can be good for finding a variety of parrots:

  • Biscayne Gardens: the neighborhoods east of I-95, between NW 151 Street and NW 135 Street, especially along South Biscayne River Drive. Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned, Black-hooded, Blue-crowned, Mitred, Red-masked, Crimson-fronted and White-eyed Parakeets; Chestnut-fronted Macaw; White-fronted, Orange-winged and Red-crowned Parrots.
  • Miami Shores: the neighborhoods east of I-95, between NE 103 Street and NE 95 Street, east to Miami Shores Country Club. Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned, Black-hooded, Blue-crowned, Mitred, Red-masked, Crimson-fronted and White-eyed Parakeets; Chestnut-fronted Macaw; White-fronted, Orange-winged and Red-crowned Parrots.
  • Miami Beach: the neighborhoods around Muss Park (on Chase Road) and Pine Tree Park (on Pine Tree Road); both parks are just north of Arthur Godfrey Road (accessed from the mainland via I-195/Julia Tuttle Causeway). Monk, Blue-crowned, Mitred. amd White-eyed Parakeets, Chestnut-fronted Macaw, Scaly-headed Parrot.
  • Miami Springs: the neighborhood around Fair Haven Nursing Home on Curtiss Parkway, as well as the neighborhood around the intersection of Wren Avenue and Apache Street. Monk, Yellow-chevroned, Blue-crowned, Green, Mitred, Scarlet-fronted, Red-masked, Crimson-fronted, White-eyed and Dusky-headed Parakeets; Blue-fronted, Orange-winged, Red-crowned and Yellow-crowned Parrots.
  • Key Biscayne: neighborhoods in the village of Key Biscayne, plus Crandon Park, Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park. Monk Parakeets.
  • South Miami: the neighborhoods between SW 56 Street (Miller Drive), SW 72 Street (Sunset Drive), SW 67 Avenue (Ludlam Road), and SW 57 Avenue (Red Road). Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned, Mitred and Red-masked Parakeets, Blue-and-yellow and Chestnut-fronted Macaws, White-fronted, Blue-fronted, Orange-winged, Red-crowned, Lilac-crowned, Yellow-crowned, Yellow-headed and Mealy Parrots.
  • A D Barnes Park: entrance is on SW 72 Avenue, north of SW 40 Street (Bird Road). Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned and Mitred Parakeets, Blue-and-yellow and Chestnut-fronted Macaws, Orange-winged Parrot.
  • Baptist Hospital area: the neighborhoods between US 1 (South Dixie Highway) and SR 874 (Don Shula Expessway), SR 878 (Snapper Creek Expressway) and SW 88 Street (North Kendall Drive). Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned and Mitred Parakeets.
  • Kendall Indian Hammocks Park: entrance is on SW 107 Avenue, north of SW 88 Street (North Kendall Drive). Monk Parakeets.
  • Matheson Hammock Park: entrance is on Old Cutler Road, south of SW 88 Street (North Kendall Drive). Monk, White-winged, Yellow-chevroned and Red-masked Parakeets, Blue-and-yellow Macaw,Lilac-crowned Parakeet.
  • Metrozoo/Larry and Penny Thompson Park: west of Florida's Turnpike; the entrance to Metrozoo is on SW 152 Street (Coral Reef Drive), the entrance to Larry and Penny Thompson Park is on SW 184 Street (Eureka Drive). Monk and Nanday Parakeets.

Locations to look for parrots in Broward County include:

  • Richardson Park: Wilton Manors. Blue-crowned Parakeet.
  • Las Olas Blvd and side streets to the north from Hendricks Isle east through Nurmi Drive.

The most reliable way to locate parrots in residential neighborhoods is by driving side streets with the windows down, listening for squawking. Early morning and late afternoon are most productive. As always when birding in urban areas, common sense is essential. Avoid birding alone. Lock car doors and secure valuables out of sight. Do not trespass on private property.
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Cuban Pewee

Cuban Pewees, sometimes called Crescent-eyed Pewees, are resident in the Bahamas and Cuba, but there are only a few records in Florida. The last sighting was from Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park on Key Biscayne, in 2017. Another was seen at Crandon Park on Key Biscayne, in 2016. The previous sighting was from Long Pine Key in Everglades National Park, in 2010.
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Alder Flycatcher

Alder Flycatchers can be found annually during late August and September in “The Annex” area along Aerojet Road. Pic/ID
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Vermilion Flycatcher

Vermilion Flycatchers now winter almost annually in Florida. Most recently, one has wintered at the north end of the L31-W Canal, located just east of the entrance to Everglades National Park. Pic/ID
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Brown-crested Flycatcher

A few Brown-crested Flycatchers are seen annually during winter. The best locations to find them are in and around Everglades National Park and along the C11E canal, about 2.5 miles east of the park entrance. Listen for their big “whit” call. Keep in mind that they are substantially outnumbered by Great Crested Flycatchers. Pic/ID
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Tropical Kingbird

Tropical Kingbirds now winter almost annually in south Florida. Recent locations include along SR 9336 outside Everglades National Park, at the S-334 Water Control Structure west of Krome Avenue on Tamiami Trail and at STAs in Palm Beach and Hendry Counties. Pic/ID
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La Sagra's Flycatcher

La Sagra's Flycatchers are resident in the Bahamas and Cuba, but are seen in Florida almost annually, typically at coastal locations such as on Key Biscayne and Key Largo.
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Gray Kingbird

Gray Kingbirds are common and conspicuous during spring and summer in suburban Miami and throughout the Keys; they can usually be found around shopping centers. Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park on Key Biscayne is another reliable location; they often perch on wires near the lighthouse. Pic/ID
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Loggerhead Kingbird

Loggerhead Kingbirds are resident in the Bahamas, Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. The first verified sighting in Florida was from Fort Zachary Taylor State Park in 2007, with a repeat visit in 2009. The most recent sighting was in Hialeah in 2017.
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Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, along with Western Kingbirds, can often be found in Flamingo, Everglades National Park, during winter. Check along the main park road from the visitor center to Eco Pond. Near the park entrance, check the wires and fences along SR 9336 and around Lucky Hammock on Aerojet Road. Pic/ID
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Thick-billed Vireo

Thick-billed Vireos are resident in the Bahamas, but are sporadically seen in Florida, typically in coastal areas. The most recent sightings are from Crandon Park in 2017 and John U. Lloyd Beach State Park and Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park in 2016.
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Bell's Vireo

Bell's Vireo winters almost annually in south Florida. A good location is the Lucky Hammock area on Aerojet Road. Pic/ID
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Black-whiskered Vireo

During spring and summer, Black-whiskered Vireos are easiest to find in the Florida Keys, where they sing incessantly throughout the day. Good locations include Key Largo Hammocks State Botanical Site and Long Key State Park. During spring migration, Black-whiskered Vireos are often seen and heard at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park, Matheson Hammock Park and in hammocks throughout Everglades National Park. Pic/ID
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Florida Scrub-Jay

The closest reliable locations in south Florida for Florida Scrub-Jay, the only bird endemic to Florida, are Jupiter Ridge Natural Area, in Palm Beach County, and Jonathan Dickinson State Park, in Martin County. Pic/ID
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Bahama Swallow

Bahama Swallows are endemic to the Bahamas, but are very rarely seen in Florida. In the fall of 2014, several were seen and Long Key and Curry Hammock State Parks in the Middle Keys; another was seen at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park on Key Biscayne.
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Cave Swallow

At dawn and dusk during spring and summer, look for Cave Swallows of the West Indian race under Florida Turnpike bridges, such as over Black Creek, just north of Southwest 216th Street in Cutler Ridge and under a bridge over Snapper Creek at SW 107 Avenue just north of Sunset Drive (SW 72 Street); they may be also seen collecting mud for nests or feeding at Cutler Wetlands and Dump Marsh. Pic/ID
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Brown-headed Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch has been reintroduced to pine rocklands in Everglades National Park, and can be seen in and around the Long Pine Key picnic area and campground, as well as in pinelands along Research Road. Pic/ID
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Red-whiskered Bulbul

Red-whiskered Bulbuls are often seen in the neighborhoods around Baptist Hospital on SW 88 Street (Kendall Drive), including the Kendallwood neighborhood on SW 82 Street, west of SW 87 Avenue, around Kenwood Elementary (SW 79 Avenue, 0.2 miles south of Kendall Drive) and in the Kings Creek area north of Kendall Drive and west of the Palmetto Expressway. Pic/ID
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Bahama Mockingbird

Bahama Mockingbirds are resident in the Bahamas, Jamaica and on islands off the northern coast of Cuba, but are seen almost annually in Florida, typically at coastal locations. Recent sightings include Crandon Park and Windley Key State Park in 2017 and Hugh Taylor Birch State Park and on No Name Key in 2016.
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Common Myna

Common Mynas can be found around shopping centers and fast-food restaurants throughout Miami and the Keys.
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Hill Myna

Hill Mynas prefer tropical hardwood hammocks and are easiest to find at Matheson Hammock Park and adjacent Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Miami-Dade. Other good locations are around Baptist Hospital on North Kendall Drive, and at A D Barnes and Kendall Indian Hammocks Park.
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Cuban Golden (Yellow) Warbler

This West Indian subspecies of the Yellow Warbler breeds in mangrove forests in the Keys and Everglades National Park. A reliable location is around the Card Sound Bridge tollbooth on Card Sound Road; the bridge connects Key Largo to the mainland.
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Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warblers are at the southern end of their breeding range in south Florida. Here they breed in cypress swamps such as those in Big Cypress National Preserve. A reliable location is at Sweetwater Strand, on Loop Road in Big Cypress. Pic/ID
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Yellow-breasted Chat

Yellow-breated Chat winters annually in south Florida. Good locations include the Lucky Hammock area on Aerojet Road and around Eco Pond in Flamingo, Everglades National Park. Pic/ID
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Bananaquit

The Bananaquit is easy to find in the Bahamas. In south Florida, it is an occasional visitor during fall, winter, and spring. It is most likely to show up in the keys or within a few miles of the coast. Recent sightings have been at Crandon Park, North Shore Open Space Park on Miami Beach and Richardson Park in Broward County.
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Western Spindalis

Western Spindalis are resident in the Bahamas and Cuba, but are seen almost annually in Florida, typically at coastal locations. In 2009, a pair successfully nested at Long Pine Key in Everglades National Park, the first North American breeding record for this species.
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Yellow-faced Grassquit

Yellow-faced Grassquits are resident in Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico and Jamaica, but are rarely seen in Florida. The most recent sightings were from Fort Zachary Tayler in Key West in 2009, the Dry Tortugas in 2002 and Eco Pond in Everglades National Park in 2001.
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Black-faced Grassquit

Black-faced Grassquits are resident throughout the Caribbean (though rare and local in Cuba), but are rarely seen in Florida. The most recent sightings was from Long Key State Park in 2016.
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Bachman's Sparrow

Bachman's Sparrows are year-round residents of pinelands with a saw palmetto understory, but are easiest to find when males are singing. Try the Kitching Creek Trail at Jonathan Dickinson State Park in Martin County, or Babcock-Webb Wildlife Management Area in Charlotte County. Pic/ID
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Sharp-tailed Sparrows

Both Nelson's and Saltmarsh Sparrows (Nelson's predominates) can sometimes be found during winter around Flamingo, in Everglades National Park. Check the Coastal Prairie Trail, which starts at the end of the campground, or coastal prairie habitat behind Eco Pond. Saltmarsh Pic/ID
Nelson's Pic/ID
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Seaside Sparrow

The Cape Sable race of Seaside Sparrow, once considered a separate species, is most easily found during the breeding season (late winter/early spring), when they are singing. The most reliable location is in Everglades National Park, in sawgrass prairie beginning about 0.5 mile past the Mahogany Hammock turnoff. SS Pic/ID
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Painted Bunting

Painted Buntings come to feeders during winter at Castellow Hammock and Bill Sadowski Parks in Miami Dade, as well as Green Cay Wetlands and Okeeheelee Nature Center in Palm Beach. Also look for Painted Buntings in brushy areas around Lucky Hammock and the Annex in Southern Glades WEA, and along Snake Bight and Coastal Prairie Trails in Everglades National Park. Pic/ID
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Shiny Cowbird

Shiny Cowbirds can sometimes be found during spring and summer among flocks of Brown-headed Cowbirds, feeding in grassy areas around the Flamingo Visitor Center parking lots in Everglades National Park. They also come to seed feeders in the Homestead area. Pic/ID
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Bronzed Cowbird

Bronzed Cowbirds, which have recently become regular denizens of south Florida, have been regularly seen in Hialeah, at Flamingo in Everglades National Park and at Eagle Lakes Park in Naples. Check any cowbird flock you see for both Bronzed and Shiny Cowbirds. Pic/ID
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Spot-breasted Oriole

Spot-Breasted Orioles can be found throughout the suburbs of southeastern Florida, most often in areas with exotic flowering trees. Check neighborhoods in Biscayne Gardens, Miami Shores, Miami Springs, South Miami and around Baptist Hospital on Kendall Drive. The oriole has also been found at A.D. Barnes, Kendall Indian Hammock and Bill Sadowski Parks in Miami-Dade and Markham Park in Broward. Pic/ID
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Scaly-breasted Munia

Scaly-breasted Munias, formerly known as Nutmeg Mannikins, can be found in weedy, overgrown areas in Miami-Dade County, primarily in the Cutler Bay area. Munias are now regularly visiting seed feeders at the Deering Estate at Cutler visitor center. They are occasionally seen in weedy areas on the west side of Matheson Hammock Park.
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References

  • Herbert Raffaele et al., “A Guide to the Birds of the West Indies,” Princeton University Press, 1998.
  • William B. Robertson, Jr. and Glen E. Woolfenden, “Florida Bird Species: An Annotated List,” Florida Ornithological Society, 1992.
  • Henry M. Stevenson and Bruce H. Anderson, “The Birdlife of Florida,” University Press of Florida, 1994